Our Stories Our Places Heritage and Character Grant Program

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Council has established a new grant program to assist owners of heritage buildings to preserve our history for future generations.

Our Stories Our Places Heritage and Character Grant Program provides a means for Council to deliver financial assistance to owners of eligible properties to undertake conservation works on local and state heritage places, and on commercial character buildings within the traditional main streets of Bundaberg and Childers.

Under this grant program, Council may contribute 50% (dollar-for-dollar) toward eligible conservation works up to a maximum contribution by Council of $10,000 per project (excluding GST).

Eligible properties

Properties that are eligible for funding include:

  • local and state heritage places as identified within the Bundaberg Regional Council Planning Scheme;
  • commercial properties located within the main street commercial character areas in Bundaberg and Childers (see eligibility maps).

To find out whether a property is identified as a local heritage place, you can either view Council’s interactive mapping or Schedule 2 of the planning scheme.

To find out whether your property is identified as a state heritage place, you can either view Council's interactive mapping or search the Queensland Heritage Register.

The mapped main street commercial character areas of Bundaberg and Childers (see eligibility maps) generally reflect the commercial character areas identified within the planning scheme.

Who can apply?

To be eligible for the grant program, the applicant must:

  • Be either the owner or occupier of the place, or a person employed on behalf of the owner/occupier to undertake the works (e.g. consultant, architect).
  • Where the applicant is not the owner, the applicant must obtain the consent of the owner for the lodgement of the application.

Public sector entities, or persons acting on behalf of a public sector entity to undertake the works, are not eligible to apply for the grant program.

Eligible Projects

Consistent with the purpose and objectives of this grant program, Council seeks to incentivise the following conservation works:

  • Exterior works that contribute to the streetscape character;
  • Reinstatement of lost features important to the character of the place (e.g. verandahs, window treatments);
  • Urgent remedial work (e.g. restumping, repairs to awnings, reroofing, repairs to or sympathetic replacement of damaged or deteriorated material);
  • Removal or replacement of unsympathetic signage with improved signage that is compatible with the character of the building and streetscape;
  • Repainting the place in its original colour scheme or a pre-approved equivalent.

How do I apply?

Please refer to the Heritage and Character Grant Guidelines and Policy for important information about eligibility and application requirements.

Once you have reviewed these documents carefully, please contact Council's Development Group to initiate preliminary discussions (including a site visit) with Council Officers to determine eligibility of the proposed conservation works and receive further information for the lodgement of a funding application with Council.

Applications will be received on an on-going basis within the application period which closes 31 May 2024, unless the allocated budget has been exhausted sooner.

Resources

Council has established a new grant program to assist owners of heritage buildings to preserve our history for future generations.

Our Stories Our Places Heritage and Character Grant Program provides a means for Council to deliver financial assistance to owners of eligible properties to undertake conservation works on local and state heritage places, and on commercial character buildings within the traditional main streets of Bundaberg and Childers.

Under this grant program, Council may contribute 50% (dollar-for-dollar) toward eligible conservation works up to a maximum contribution by Council of $10,000 per project (excluding GST).

Eligible properties

Properties that are eligible for funding include:

  • local and state heritage places as identified within the Bundaberg Regional Council Planning Scheme;
  • commercial properties located within the main street commercial character areas in Bundaberg and Childers (see eligibility maps).

To find out whether a property is identified as a local heritage place, you can either view Council’s interactive mapping or Schedule 2 of the planning scheme.

To find out whether your property is identified as a state heritage place, you can either view Council's interactive mapping or search the Queensland Heritage Register.

The mapped main street commercial character areas of Bundaberg and Childers (see eligibility maps) generally reflect the commercial character areas identified within the planning scheme.

Who can apply?

To be eligible for the grant program, the applicant must:

  • Be either the owner or occupier of the place, or a person employed on behalf of the owner/occupier to undertake the works (e.g. consultant, architect).
  • Where the applicant is not the owner, the applicant must obtain the consent of the owner for the lodgement of the application.

Public sector entities, or persons acting on behalf of a public sector entity to undertake the works, are not eligible to apply for the grant program.

Eligible Projects

Consistent with the purpose and objectives of this grant program, Council seeks to incentivise the following conservation works:

  • Exterior works that contribute to the streetscape character;
  • Reinstatement of lost features important to the character of the place (e.g. verandahs, window treatments);
  • Urgent remedial work (e.g. restumping, repairs to awnings, reroofing, repairs to or sympathetic replacement of damaged or deteriorated material);
  • Removal or replacement of unsympathetic signage with improved signage that is compatible with the character of the building and streetscape;
  • Repainting the place in its original colour scheme or a pre-approved equivalent.

How do I apply?

Please refer to the Heritage and Character Grant Guidelines and Policy for important information about eligibility and application requirements.

Once you have reviewed these documents carefully, please contact Council's Development Group to initiate preliminary discussions (including a site visit) with Council Officers to determine eligibility of the proposed conservation works and receive further information for the lodgement of a funding application with Council.

Applications will be received on an on-going basis within the application period which closes 31 May 2024, unless the allocated budget has been exhausted sooner.

Resources

  • Heritage honoured in Childers store repaint

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    The long history of 80 Churchill Street, Childers will be honoured with a fresh repaint in a heritage colour scheme, with support from Bundaberg Regional Council’s Our Stories Our Places grant program.

    Currently operating as a jewellery store, the building has been owned for almost 50 years by June Robinson, who bought it with her late-husband Earle in 1976.

    “My late husband and I, we were newsagents here from 1970 until 1984,” June said.

    “You knew everybody, you talked to everybody, you heard everybody's funny stories, and some were sad, some were happy, and there were lots of wonderful incidents.

    “That was 14 of the happiest years of my life, it was wonderful being part of the street.”

    June’s family has lived in the Childers area for generations and she said she had taken a keen interest in the history of the area.

    “I've always been interested in historical things, I've collected them forever,” she said.

    “Right from a little child, anything that was old, I had to take home and try to make it new.

    “The historical part of Childers really does interest me.”

    Building history

    On 23 March 1902, much of the south side of Childers’ Churchill Street was destroyed by a fire that burned through the original timber-constructed buildings.

    Bundaberg architect F H Faircloth was commissioned to design a row of five new masonry buildings, three of which were owned by chemist Thomas Gaydon, and two by Alfred Gorrie.

    Alfred Gorrie operated one of the stores as a baker and confectioner, while the other was occupied by hairdresser and barber William Lloyd, whose premises had been destroyed in the fire.

    When June and Earle bought the property in 1976, the two stores were still on one deed, which they later separated when they sold 82 Churchill Street to the bakery occupant.

    It is the former barbershop that they ran as a newsagent, and which now houses the jewellery store.

    The buildings were designed with features such as decorative posts supporting awnings, large glass shopfronts and separate roofs over each shop façade.

    F H Faircloth enhanced the features using classic revival pediments, lanterns, urns and balustrades.

    These features contribute to Childers’ distinctive heritage streetscape that is notable for its cohesive architectural style.

    “I think you'd go a long way before you would find a whole street of heritage buildings,” June said.

    “We've got the most wonderful skylight inside.

    “You might notice up and down the street, there's little bits of beauty, there's skylights and there's stained glass windows, and that's our little bit of decoration.

    “And of course, the tiled floor, there's not too many of those around, and that's very special.”

    Our Stories Our Places grant

    The Our Stories Our Places grant program supports private owners undertaking heritage or character improving works on eligible properties, with Council contributing 50% of the cost of the conservation works up to a maximum of $10,000 per project.

    June received a grant for $4,250 to assist in repainting the exterior of the building in a heritage approved colour scheme of Colorbond Classic Cream with architectural features to be painted Indian Red and Colorbond Pale Eucalypt.

    Many of the buildings in Childers, including 80 Churchill Street, are protected by State Government heritage listing, and so the proposed work was also assessed by the Queensland Department of Environment and Science to ensure the colour scheme is compatible with the heritage value of the building.

    Applications for Our Stories Our Places grants will be accepted on an on-going basis until 31 May 2024, while funding remains available.

    Read the full Bundaberg Now story here.

  • Heritage grant to preserve unique coastal church

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    For 85 years the St John The Divine Anglican Church has played an important role in the Burnett Heads community with an Our Stories Our Places grant set to preserve its unique façade.

    The Bundaberg Regional Council heritage grant initiative provides dollar-for-dollar contributions to preservation projects in defined areas which will positively contribute to the region’s streetscapes.

    Listed as one of Council’s Local Heritage Places and located at 1 Paul Mittelheuser Street in Burnett Heads, the design of the St John The Divine Anglican Church is unique to this area with its Tudor-style construction and basalt base laid with locally-sourced volcanic rock.

    In its February meeting Council approved a $6,356.45 Our Stories Our Places grant towards conservation measures for the church.

    Valued at $12,712.90 the project will see like-for-like timber replacements on the bell tower, windowsills and front façade in addition to repainting of the front façade.

    Anglican Parish representative Neil Phythian said he was grateful for the grant provided through Council’s Our Stories Our Places program.

    “The short answer is we wouldn’t be able to do it [without the grant funding],” Neil said.

    “Money is very tight at the moment and all the costs have gone up.”

    He said, from Christmas Carols to community events, eight decades later the unique church continued to play a pivotal role in the community.

    “It’s probably the oldest community building,” Neil said.

    “The fact that it’s unusual, it’s got a stone base, it’s got that Tudor-style timber on the outside, it’s got a very unusual, curved roof.”

    He said tourists and locals frequently photographed the building and the parish and ladies’ guild hosted regular community events.

    “We do have a pet blessing service in October and that attracts a lot of people with dogs from Burnett Heads and everywhere really,” Neil said.

    “We also ring the bells for the first turtle coming up in the turtle season.”

    History of St John the Divine Anglican Church Burnett Heads

    In the 1930s Burnett Heads was a small fishing village on the south bank of the Burnett River, which consisted of men’s cottages and fishermen’s holiday homes.

    Neil said the attraction of the coastal lifestyle and the possibility of growth in the area made it the logical place to expand the Anglican Parish of Bundaberg.

    Mr Christie Mittleheuser donated a block of land near the coast for a church to be built, although it remained vacant for some years until 1939 when Rector of Bundaberg the Reverend Harold Osborn decided it was the ideal location for the church, named for Saint John the Evangelist.

    Neil said the parish was determined not to build a wooden building on wooden stumps, which was the usual construction for country churches at the time, which led to the English Tudor design on a base of basalt rock.

    At the time volcanic rock was abundant in the area and served as a cheap material for the building's base.

    “All hand-split rocks, and the front fence is made of them too,” Neil said.

    According to Council’s Local Heritage Places report, the foundation stone was laid by the Most Rev. J.W.C. Wand on 6 August 1939 who described the site as “the most beautiful of any church throughout the diocese”.

    It’s not just the building’s façade which holds unique heritage features.

    Inside visitors will find original furnishings, including kerosene lamps that were installed when the church was first erected.

    “These are the same lights that lit the original Christ Church in 1878,” Neil said.

    “We light them now on special occasions such as when we hold the Christmas Carols at the end of the year.”

    Find out more about the Anglican Parish of Bundaberg on the website.


    Read the full Bundaberg Now story here.

  • Childers Post Office to get heritage refresh

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    The historic Childers Post Office, built in 1890, will receive some tender loving care to ensure the ongoing protection of this iconic part of the Childers streetscape.

    Building owners Janet and Peter Anderson received a grant for $10,000 under Bundaberg Regional Council’s Our Stories Our Places grant program, an initiative that supports private owners undertaking heritage or character improving works on eligible properties.

    The timber building, at 65 Churchill Street, will receive a full exterior repaint including the roof in the existing traditional colour scheme, with the grant funding comprising approximately one third of the total cost of the repainting works.

    Owner Janet Anderson said she did six months of research and obtaining quotes to find the right company to take on the job, such was the importance of getting it right for the town.

    “It is very expensive to maintain and look after a large timber structure such as the Childers Post Office,” Janet said.

    “It is important not to let it deteriorate as its historical value is very important especially given its location in the centre of town.

    “We always felt that the people of Childers ‘owned’ the Post Office and we are just guardians.”

    With four grant applications awarded under the Our Stories Our Places program to date, Mayor Jack Dempsey said he was pleased eligible building owners had embraced the initiative.

    “It’s fantastic to see the work being done with the support of Council’s Our Stories Our Places grants will have such a positive impact on our heritage streetscapes,” Mayor Dempsey said.

    Building History

    The Childers Post and Telegraph Office was built in 1890 and opened 17 September 1890.

    The tender to construct the new office was awarded to John Jones in the amount £436, with six months given for completion.

    The Post Office’s location on the north side of Churchill Street meant it survived the devastating fire of March 1902 that destroyed most of the then timber-built buildings on the south side of the street.

    The Post Office was extended in 1910 by the Queensland Government Architect’s Office.

    Janet and her husband Peter bought the building in 1990 after Australia Post began to sell some outlets to be run as Licensed Post Offices.

    The Andersons ran a gift shop and Post Office until 2022, when they sold the business but retained ownership of the building.

    Given the building’s prominence and importance in the town’s history, it was listed on the Queensland Heritage Register on 24 January 2003.

    Peter was born and raised in Childers and has a long family history in the region including a distant relative, Mr W Beale, who the family believe was the first Childers Postmaster in 1890, and who was later station master at the Childers Railway Station.

    Janet said they thought it was extremely important to preserve the character of the region’s heritage and character buildings like the Childers Post Office.

    “Not only because they represent particular architecture of the time but also because they embody a rich history during the development of our region,” she said.

    “There have been many modifications over the years to bring it to where it is today.

    “It is still a functioning Post Office after 133 years!”

    Under the Our Stories Our Places program, Council will contribute 50% of the cost of the conservation works up to a maximum of $10,000 per project.


    Read the full Bundaberg Now story here.

  • Bourbong Street beauty returns to heritage colours

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    A Bourbong Street building façade will be repainted to restore its historic charm and add to the heritage character of the Bundaberg CBD main street, where it has stood for over 100 years.

    Owner of 69 Bourbong Street, Ben Neilson, received a grant for $9,025 under the Bundaberg Regional Council’s Our Stories Our Places grant program to repaint the building’s exterior in a traditional colour scheme of white and grey.

    Our Stories Our Places is a Council initiative that supports private owners undertaking heritage or character improving works on eligible places.

    By undertaking the work, Ben said he wanted to help foster a sense of cultural identity and pride among Bundaberg residents.

    “The preservation of Bundaberg's heritage character and buildings is an investment in the community's future,” he said.

    “It creates a sense of continuity, fosters civic pride, and enriches the quality of life for residents while attracting visitors who appreciate the unique charm and history that Bundaberg has to offer.

    “Preserving these structures also fosters a greater understanding of the challenges and triumphs faced by previous generations.

    “It allows for the recognition of diverse cultural narratives and histories that have shaped the community.

    “By valuing and safeguarding these assets, Bundaberg ensures that its cultural heritage remains a living, integral part of its identity.”

    Under the program, Council will contribute 50% of the cost of the conservation works up to a maximum of $10,000 per project.

    Ben said he appreciated the opportunity to be supported by Council to complete the repainting.

    “The local Council acts as a capital partner and their willingness to contribute suggests they too are interested in preserving and enhancing the unique character of Bundaberg,” he said.

    “We are deeply appreciative of the support and resources provided through this grant, which will undoubtedly have a lasting positive impact on the character and charm of our region.”

    Mayor Jack Dempsey said the repainting works would make a valuable contribution to the heritage profile of Bourbong Street.

    “It’s fantastic to see the work being done with the support of Council’s Our Stories Our Places grants will have such a positive impact to the streetscape,” Mayor Dempsey said.

    “We appreciate the commitment of heritage building owners, like Ben, who are preserving and enhancing our region’s unique character, and for ensuring these buildings continue to play a role in civic life.”


    Bourbong Street heritage researched

    The colour scheme planned by Ben was the result of his research into the history and former appearance of the building.

    “We used research through access to local archives and historical records to help identify the most critical aspects requiring attention to retain the initial characteristics that have been forgotten over time,” Ben said.

    “It can be seen in many of the historical main street photographs and has played host to various businesses over its time.

    “It was the original Bundaberg supermarket in the mid-1900s and still has the original crane used to lower supplies down into waiting carts.

    “Out the back (Quay St entrance) we have maintained the original brickwork and hitchrack where folks used to tie their horses before entering town, today it is often used as a popular location for wedding photos.”

    The repainting is just part of the heritage-sympathetic changes Ben has planned for the building, including removing advertising signage in the upper windows.

    “She boasts beautiful hardwood floors, and the entire upstairs area is about to undergo a major renovation to bring it back to its original setting and make the most of this relaxing space,” he said.

    “These buildings often embody architectural styles and craftsmanship that reflect the values, aspirations, and skills of the communities that built them.

    “In addition, heritage conservation contributes to sustainable development by promoting adaptive reuse of existing structures.

    “It serves as a tangible link to the past, allowing current and future generations to connect with the history and cultural identity of the region.”

    Applications for Our Stories Our Places grants will be accepted on an ongoing basis until 31 May 2024, while funding remains available.


    Read the full Bundaberg Now story here.

  • Our Stories Our Places provides heritage support

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    The $100,000 Our Stories Our Places grant fund has been established to support conservation works on local heritage places and main street commercial character buildings.

    The Bundaberg Regional Council initiative, announced as part of Council’s 2023-24 budget, has been developed to support private owners of eligible heritage and character places.

    The Our Stories Our Places grants will see Council contribute up to 50%, dollar for dollar, towards eligible conservation works up to a maximum contribution by Council of $10,000 per project.

    Mayor Jack Dempsey said applications for the Our Stories Our Places grant program would open on 1 September 2023.

    “There are many buildings within our region that, through their architecture and heritage value, help to tell our community’s stories,” Mayor Dempsey said.

    “By maintaining these buildings we’re preserving our community’s unique history and spirit, but it can also come with an added cost burden.

    “Council is committed to partnering with property owners to support the upkeep of these beautiful buildings and streetscapes which are much-loved by residents and much-admired by visitors.”

    The Childers Chamber of Commerce welcomed the availability of funding when it was announced, after meeting with Council in November 2022 to discuss the possibility of a heritage incentive scheme being introduced.

    Eligible properties for Our Stories Our Places funding include:

    • Local heritage places as identified within the Bundaberg Regional Council Planning Scheme
    • Heritage places and commercial properties located within the main street commercial character areas in Bundaberg and Childers

    The mapped main street commercial character areas of Bundaberg and Childers generally reflect the commercial character areas identified within the planning scheme, modified to include state heritage places.

    State heritage places are only eligible for the grant where they locate within these mapped main street commercial character areas.

    Publicly owned buildings are not proposed to be eligible for funding under this program.

    Subject to the availability of funding, applications will be accepted on an on-going basis within the application period which closes 31 May 2024.

    For more information click here.

    Read the full Bundaberg Now story here.

Page last updated: 08 Apr 2024, 02:10 PM